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Lifeguards and Safety


Even when you’re in Atlantic City enjoying one of the top East Coast beaches, safety counts. Although the Atlantic Ocean usually offers up gentle, rolling waves, it can occasionally kick up some rough currents, so you should swim only where lifeguards are present on New Jersey beaches. Atlantic City had the first paid, professional lifesaving squad in the world, and they're still tops in making sure you stay safe on our New Jersey beaches. Anyone can enjoy the accessible beaches here in Atlantic City–here's the skinny on where and when to take a dip on some of the top East Coast beaches:

Lifeguards are on duty from 10am - 6pm at 50 locations from Caspian Ave. to Jackson Ave. July 1 - Labor Day. (A limited number of New Jersey beaches are protected from Memorial Day to July 1, and Labor Day to September 30.)

There are 11 District Stations that provide first aid, certified EMTs, and communications. District Stations are located at: Caspian Ave., New Hampshire Ave., States Ave., South Carolina Ave., Kentucky Ave., Michigan Ave., Mississippi Ave., Texas Ave., Chelsea Ave., Albany Ave., and Bartram Ave. 

Swimming Safety Advice
  • Please be sure to follow instructions from the lifeguards, they can provide you with valuable information about swimming in the ocean currents and rip tides.
  • Brochures are available at lifeguard stands about after-hours bathing. Click here to view or print brochure. Signage in English and Spanish is posted at all lifeguard stations about swimming safety and rip tides.
  • Never swim alone - use the buddy system.
  • Don't overestimate your swimming ability, especially early in the summer when the water is cold.Swimming ability is severely decreased in cold water.
  • Judge your ability to participate in beach activities based on your swimming skills without the assistance of rafts and other flotation devices.
  • Never dive into shallow water, or water of unknown depth.
  • If you are confronted by a large wave and there is not enough time to get away from it, try to dive underneath the wave.  Keep your body as low as possible until the wave passes over you.  Timing is important, dive into the base of the wave just before it breaks.  Do not dive if the water is too shallow - instead crouch and keep a low body profile.
  • If caught in rip currents, relax and swim toward the shore at a 45-degree angle until you are free of the current.  If the rip currents are strong, swim parallel with the shoreline in the same direction as the littoral current and then swim diagonally toward the shore.  If you are not able to swim out of the currents, call  or  wave for help.
  • When body surfing, do not ride waves in a straight line toward shore. Instead, surf at an angle to the waves.  Stay away from the white water in the wave center to avoid going "over the falls."
  • Never swim while intoxicated.  Alcohol impairs judgment, unnecessary risks are taken and a swimmer will tire more easily, increasing the chance of an accident.